Can I Submit an Article?

Articles can only be submitted by NAWG members or groups or bodies affiliated of NAWG.  Not a member? Don't worry, becoming a member is easy, we'd love to hear from you.

Articles can be submitted by post or emailed to the Link editor. Please see our editorial policy for more information.

Article Actions
Article Information
Author: Pam Fish Date: April 2, 2010 6:39 pm
Categories: Link magazine Tags: None
Responses: 1 – open Article: 342 – published
1 response for article: Can I Submit an Article?

response as:

Steve Partridge: September 14, 2012 10:59 am

I am a member of "Reading Writers". The secretary of RW Josh Williams, suggested I sent this to the editor of Link Magazine to be considered for publication in Link Magazine.

It's a piece of Flash Fiction I produced for a RW MS evening. It's entitled "Flash Fiction".

Flash Fiction

I sit staring at a blank electronic page, sipping a Kenco Costa Rican, waiting for a metaphor to come along. First nothing. Then like lemmings they come, streaming, broadband quick and intense as chocolate hits, teeming out of their canyons, crevices and hidey holes. Newly born, screaming, bloodied, blue tinged, wet. In a millisecond they are pirated from their birth father’s fingers, shipped to calypso islands on slavers’ galleons that smash against rocky shores and spew out their manacled cargoes, to the mercy of the spume. Some drown, fathomed by the weight of their chains, in the thumping base line of the rock ’n roll swell. Survivors storm the beach, like sperm in search of an egg, they make it to the safety of the forest and the pools of fresh water imagination; only to taste the editorial crack of the slave master’s whip, leaving forever its redlined wheals. Others are left to die on the shingled shores of frustration. Bleached fragments of ghost town shells, crushed underfoot by the critical boot of random indecision. Lacerated and battered, the survivors labour in the frenetic fields of binary conversations. Trapped in a roulette of perpetual motion, where the wheel always spins, and the ball never stops; where black is the colour and none is the number, and the slave master never loses. Scurvied by a diet of semantic cliché, they daydream of liberation to the published page. While I sit staring at the printed page, sipping a Kenco Costa Rican, overwritten by delusions of grandeur and brown foxed into flash fiction.

Steve Partridge, 259 words. stevevp@btinternet.com

Response Actions
Reply
Response Information
Comment: 5038 – approved
Submit a New Comment
Alternatively, you can use your account, if you have one – Log in
Cancel

article as:

Pages
Archives
Logo: Get Creative
Image: hissac.logo-t.png

Competition & Mentorships

We are proud to be associated with the Highlands & Islands Short Story Association.